Acceptable registrations in the queue through April 6 at 7:45p ET have now been activated. Enjoy! -M.W.

Terms of Use have been amended effective October 6, 2019. Make sure you are aware of the new rules! Please visit this thread for details: https://www.mibuzzboard.com/phpBB3/view ... 16&t=48619

Vicious Dog

A place to talk about any topic on your mind (non-broadcasting related). General conversation.
User avatar
Bryce
Posts: 4892
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 12:04 pm

Vicious Dog

Post by Bryce » Sat Feb 06, 2021 10:28 pm

Believe it or not, this sweet boy has bitten three people. It was suggested by animal control and a veterinarian that he be put down.

Image

He's not vicious at all. Just afraid of new people and new things. When people don't heed his warning signals, he does what comes naturally to defend himself from a perceived threat. He needs to discover and investigate new things on his own time table.

In about 30 days or so, he will have overcome his fear anxiety and then this 2,000.00 dog will be adopted for a 250.00 donation because someone with shit for brains doesn't know how to properly raise a puppy.


~ Joe Biden - Destroying America One Pen Stroke At A Time ~

User avatar
Turkeytop
Posts: 5832
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:27 pm

Re: Vicious Dog

Post by Turkeytop » Sat Feb 06, 2021 10:46 pm

You can help it overcome the problem?

Our neighbour gave up her 4 month old Border Collie because it was becoming aggressive toward her. Whenever she visited us she never displayed any kind of aggressive behavior. Just a sweet pup. We miss her.



User avatar
Bryce
Posts: 4892
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 12:04 pm

Re: Vicious Dog

Post by Bryce » Sat Feb 06, 2021 10:50 pm

Turkeytop wrote:
Sat Feb 06, 2021 10:46 pm
You can help it overcome the problem?

Our neighbour gave up her 4 month old Border Collie because it was become aggressive toward her. Whenever she visited us she never displayed any kind of aggressive behavior. Just a sweet pup. We miss her.
Yup. It's a simple process really. Only once have I had a dog that I put through my treatment plan become aggressive toward someone again. I will accept some responsibility for its behavior, but in reality, the new owner should have never let a teenager taunt it and pull on its ears while yelling at it.


~ Joe Biden - Destroying America One Pen Stroke At A Time ~

User avatar
Turkeytop
Posts: 5832
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:27 pm

Re: Vicious Dog

Post by Turkeytop » Sat Feb 06, 2021 10:54 pm

So is this ability of yours the result of some training you have had, or is it just something that comes natural? Like the dog whisperer.

I think the Border Collie just wanted to be the alpha dog in the house and the owner allowed it to be.



User avatar
Bryce
Posts: 4892
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 12:04 pm

Re: Vicious Dog

Post by Bryce » Sat Feb 06, 2021 11:12 pm

Turkeytop wrote:
Sat Feb 06, 2021 10:54 pm
So is this ability of yours the result of some training you have had, or is it just something that comes natural? Like the dog whisperer.
I've been working with dogs since I was 14. I've always had working breed dogs around me as a child and as I got older I became interested in training and working with them. Mind you, this was well before the internet, cable TV shows etc. I learned in person from guys who trained hunting dogs, tracking dogs and what in the day were called "watch dogs." A lot of it was trial and error. Sad to admit, but I ruined a few really good dogs in my teenage years because I was still in the learning stage. One that still haunts me was an exceptional Belgian Malinois that I tried to train the same way I was training German Shepherd Dogs at the time and didn't yet know they were much more emotional than GSD's and needed to be trained differently. Dobermans are even different than Belgians in what their mental and emotional state will handle. The biggest thing I learned over time is no two breeds are the same and no two dogs of even the same breed are the same. It's my job to crawl into their head and discover what makes them tick. THAT took a good amount of self training on MY part to figure out.

Anyway, my trial and error method payed off. Combined with workshops and Schutzhund competitions that my charges competed in, I got to the point that at one time, while in the employ of Uncle Sam, I was training the dogs that kept our boy's serving in the sand safe from IED's and bad guys with guns and bombs and some of our state side K-9 officers.

I'm older now and not completely up to the physical challenges of doing all that is required at that level, so I've redirected my skills to something I'm able to do and still make a positive contribution.

Oh and by the way. Caesar (the dog whisperer) is mostly full of shit in my book.
Last edited by Bryce on Sat Feb 06, 2021 11:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.


~ Joe Biden - Destroying America One Pen Stroke At A Time ~

User avatar
Bryce
Posts: 4892
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 12:04 pm

Re: Vicious Dog

Post by Bryce » Sat Feb 06, 2021 11:14 pm

Turkeytop wrote:
Sat Feb 06, 2021 10:54 pm

I think the Border Collie just wanted to be the alpha dog in the house and the owner allowed it to be.
BRILLAINT observation. You may be spot on. Coupled with the fact that Border Collies need an EXCEPTIONAL amount of exercise and mental stimulation. If that's not met, they will act out in way's you won't like.


~ Joe Biden - Destroying America One Pen Stroke At A Time ~

User avatar
Turkeytop
Posts: 5832
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:27 pm

Re: Vicious Dog

Post by Turkeytop » Sun Feb 07, 2021 12:25 am

Oh and by the way. Caesar (the dog whisperer) is mostly full of shit in my book.
I always think that the lessons he teaches will be forgotten as soon as he leaves the scene.
Last edited by Turkeytop on Sun Feb 07, 2021 12:43 am, edited 1 time in total.



MotorCityRadioFreak
Posts: 2941
Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2020 6:26 am
Location: Worn, MI

Re: Vicious Dog

Post by MotorCityRadioFreak » Sun Feb 07, 2021 12:31 am

Bryce wrote:
Sat Feb 06, 2021 10:28 pm
Believe it or not, this sweet boy has bitten three people. It was suggested by animal control and a veterinarian that he be put down.

Image

He's not vicious at all. Just afraid of new people and new things. When people don't heed his warning signals, he does what comes naturally to defend himself from a perceived threat. He needs to discover and investigate new things on his own time table.

In about 30 days or so, he will have overcome his fear anxiety and then this 2,000.00 dog will be adopted for a 250.00 donation because someone with shit for brains doesn't know how to properly raise a puppy.
So, he's okay as long as he doesn't bite YOU. Plenty of dogs struggle with other dogs and not humans or like women and hate men, or vice versa. How do you know that he will overcome his anxiety? Dogs can also take on their owners' prejudices as well.


My mom taught me an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. It's too bad Repubes don't believe in prevention for COVID, but they can deny someone water waiting in a line to vote.

User avatar
Turkeytop
Posts: 5832
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:27 pm

Re: Vicious Dog

Post by Turkeytop » Mon Feb 08, 2021 12:03 pm

When we had our dog she was afraid of men. Must have been because I treated her so mean.

She also disliked black people, which always puzzled me. She was black herself.



User avatar
Bryce
Posts: 4892
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 12:04 pm

Re: Vicious Dog

Post by Bryce » Mon Feb 08, 2021 12:36 pm

Dogs don't see a full range of color like we do. They experience the world around them in shades of yellow, blue and grey.

If your dog's world had nothing but light skinned people in it, when exposed to someone with dark skin, it could cause a fear reaction be because that dark skinned person didn't look like the people it was used to.

That's why it's so important at the ages of 8 to 16 weeks a new pup be exposed to everything they possibly can. People, places, things. Most dog bites are caused by fear or improper training.


~ Joe Biden - Destroying America One Pen Stroke At A Time ~

User avatar
Bryce
Posts: 4892
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 12:04 pm

Re: Vicious Dog

Post by Bryce » Mon Feb 08, 2021 12:42 pm

MotorCityRadioFreak wrote:
Sun Feb 07, 2021 12:31 am


So, he's okay as long as he doesn't bite YOU. Plenty of dogs struggle with other dogs and not humans or like women and hate men, or vice versa. How do you know that he will overcome his anxiety? Dogs can also take on their owners' prejudices as well.
No. He'll be OK when he doesn't feel the need to bite anyone. Building his general confidence, introducing problem solving with positive outcomes and teaching him that the things he fears are actually good and wonderful will get him to that place.


~ Joe Biden - Destroying America One Pen Stroke At A Time ~

User avatar
Turkeytop
Posts: 5832
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:27 pm

Re: Vicious Dog

Post by Turkeytop » Mon Feb 08, 2021 12:44 pm

Before I retired, we used to spend two weeks every year at a small motel on Clearwater Beach. The owners has a yellow dog, a Lab - Pit bull mix. She was the quietest, most laid back dog you could ever meet.

The owner once told me that if a new guest arrived and the dog started barking and making a fuss, he just knew that person would be trouble before they left. They would fight or get drunk or damage something or try to steal the TV etc. The dog just had an uncanny instinct for that and her instincts never failed.



User avatar
Bryce
Posts: 4892
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 12:04 pm

Re: Vicious Dog

Post by Bryce » Mon Feb 08, 2021 12:50 pm

Yup. If my Gretta reacted that way when the girl brought a new guy over, she wasn't allowed to see him any longer. Gretta was a better judge of character than she was.


~ Joe Biden - Destroying America One Pen Stroke At A Time ~

User avatar
TC Talks
Posts: 5222
Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2005 2:41 am

Re: Vicious Dog

Post by TC Talks » Wed Feb 10, 2021 4:51 am

I came across this column today in the New York Times. It's from the ethicist.
Recently, I was on a FaceTime call with a friend I met through social media who is in the same profession as I am. Through the pandemic, we’ve brainstormed and been there for each other. So I was shocked when — via FaceTime — I was informed that my friend’s dog had bitten a few people, and so my friend felt it was best to put the dog down. But they wanted to do it themselves. They thought that going to the vet and having the vet “hold the dog down” would be inhumane. Without even thinking what the answer might be, I said: “Wait! How do you put your own dog down?” Silence. And then they said, “A gun.”

They admitted to me that they shot their own dog and buried it in a grave they dug. I couldn’t believe this. Is this legal? Is this morally OK? To me, it’s murder! They’re asking for sympathy on social media saying their loving family dog had to be “put down,” and I hate that I’m carrying this knowledge that the dog was shot and buried by its “loving” owner. What do I do?
Name Withheld

The purpose of a child, the Russian thinker Alexander Herzen suggested in his 1849 dialogue-essay “Consolatio,” is to be a child — to play, to enjoy itself, to be itself. Because children, in time, do come of age, we are tempted to think that the final aim of a child is, precisely, to come of age, gaining an adult’s plans and projects, and this, he noted, is a confusion. We are spared such confusions when it comes to dogs, because they have no long-term plans or projects: In the familiar formula, the life in their days matters more than the days in their life.

A dog that repeatedly bites people — we’re not talking about a “soft mouth” nip but a bite that inflicts injury and, typically, scars — can be legally categorized as dangerous. (Dog bites are a main reason children end up in the E.R.) What this designation entails depends on the state or municipality. A so-called dangerous dog may be required to wear a muzzle when not confined; its owner may be required to purchase a large liability-insurance policy; or, depending on statutes and circumstances, a court may simply order the dog to be euthanized. An owner can enlist the services of a behaviorist for a dog with a history of biting, but with no guarantee of success. And an owner may be subject to criminal and civil liability for injuries inflicted by the dog — resulting in the sort of penalties and payment of damages that could interfere with whatever plans and projects an owner has for herself or her family.

You’re clearly outraged, however, not only by the fact that the dog was killed but also by the way it was killed. Your friend perhaps figured that a bullet to the head, through cavitation and direct tissue destruction, would result in instantaneous oblivion, and sought to spare the creature a possibly more traumatic experience. Here’s someone who, unlike you, knows this dog intimately — someone who may have pictured how the dog would have responded to being crated up, brought to a veterinary clinic (which might have had unpleasant associations for the animal) and restrained while a nitrile-gloved clinician pushed a needle into it. Was the choice so mad? Why do you view the family’s anguish as illegitimate simply because the creature was put down at home, as animals often used to be?

We should all be concerned about animal cruelty, and dogs, with their gift for bonding with humans, will elicit your (and my) tenderest feelings. I do hope your concern extends to the immense suffering caused by factory farming, not to mention the immense suffering we routinely impose on mammals of our own species. The situation you describe is painful and fraught. Before you condemn your friend, though, be sure that your own actions and attitudes would withstand judgment.

A final note. Grieving a dog’s death, we grieve, first, our loss: the absence of a companion. Grieving the death of a person — a friend, a lover, a sibling, a parent — we grieve, first, their loss: their absence from the unfurling discoveries, desires, commitments and experiences that make up our shared world. That shared world works better when we try hard to understand one another. Summarily judging others as unworthy of sympathy impedes what should be a common goal: a truly humane society.


© 2021 TC Talks Global Inc. All Rights Reserved. By reading my content you agree to my privacy policy and except my terms of usage.

User avatar
Turkeytop
Posts: 5832
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:27 pm

Re: Vicious Dog

Post by Turkeytop » Sat Feb 13, 2021 8:06 pm

There was a dog in the neighbourhood where we used to live. A Golden Retriever. We would always see it when we were out for a walk. He would come running out to greet us with his tail wagging every time we went by his home, We always stopped and petted him. Sometimes he would run back to the house and grab one of his toys for us to throw. Nice dog.

Once, as we were nearing the house, another guy was walking along the sidewalk about 40 feet ahead of us. When the dog saw him he went bounding out to him barking, and snarling. He leapt right on the guy's back, tearing his shirt right off. I think he would have killed the guy if the owner hadn't run out and pulled him off.

After that, whenever we were out walking, we always turned down a different street, before we got to that house.



Post Reply Previous topicNext topic